Team - Diacronía Inglesa y Dialectología Inglesa
diacronía inglesa, dialectonía inglesa, English Dialectology, History of the English Language
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Core Team

María F. García Bermejo Giner

Associate Professor of English Language and Linguistics

more@usal.es

María F. García-Bermejo Giner obtained an MA in English Language and Literature from the University of Salamanca and a PhD in English Linguistics in 1989, with a dissertation supervised by Gudelia Rodríguez that studied the dialects of the West Midlands as represented in the novels of George Eliot. She has been Associate Professor in English Linguistics at the University of Salamanca since 1992, where she teaches undergraduate and MA courses on the history of the English language and English diachronic dialectology. She has been the PI of the DING group since 2009 and her main areas of research are  dialect literature and literary dialects as a source for dialectology, as well as the history of the English language and corpus linguistics.

Pilar Sánchez-García

Associate Professor of English Language and Linguistics

psg@usal.es

Pilar Sánchez-García obtained an MA in English Language and Literature from the University of Salamanca and a PhD in English Linguistics in 2000, with a dissertation supervised by Gudelia Rodríguez on the spelling representation of Northern English dialects during the nineteenth century. She has taught in the Department of English Philology in Salamanca since 1994, where she obtained a position as Associate Professor in 2015. She teaches undergraduate and MA courses on the history of the English language, linguistic variation in literary texts, and English diachronic dialectology. She has been a member of the DING group since 2009 and her main areas of research are English diachronic dialectology, corpus linguistics, literary dialects and dialect literature, corpus linguistics.

Javier Ruano-García

Associate Professor of English Language and Linguistics

fjrg@usal.es

Javier Ruano-García obtained an MA in English Language and Literature from the University of Salamanca and a PhD in English Linguistics in 2008, with a dissertation co-supervised by María F. García-Bermejo Giner and Pilar Sánchez-García on early modern northern English lexis. He has taught in the Department of English Philology in Salamanca since 2008, where he works as Associate Professor since 2019. He teaches undergraduate courses on the history of the English language, linguistic variation in Early Modern English, and MA courses on academic writing. He has been a member of the DING group since 2009. Javier’s main research interests lie in the fields of historical language variation, with a focus on regional dialects of the early and late modern English periods, historical sociolinguistics, corpus linguistics, historical dialect lexicography and manuscript editing. He has been involved in the compilation of the Salamanca Corpus for the past ten years, taking care of specimens representative of the Lancashire dialect and other varieties of northern English. Javier was José Castillejo Research Fellow (Spanish Ministry of Education and Science) in 2013 and 2015, during which time he conducted research at University College London and the University of Oxford, where he was awarded a Sassoon Visiting Fellowship in 2018. He has also done research and / or given seminars at the universities of Cambridge, Leeds, Manchester, Leipzig, the Institute of English Studies (London), Lisbon and Milan. As of 2021, he has been appointed visiting professor of English Linguistics at the Università degli Studi di Milano in the first semester of the academic year 2021-2022.

Paula Schintu

Assistant Lecturer of English Language and Linguistics

paulasch@usal.es

Paula Schintu Martínez holds a BA in English Studies from the University of Salamanca (2014) and an MA in Advanced English Studies from the Universities of Salamanca and Valladolid (2015). She is currently writing her PhD dissertation on the enregisterment of 19th and 20th-century Derbyshire dialect at the University of Salamanca under the supervision of Javier Ruano-García and María F. García-Bermejo Giner. She also works as a Part-time lecturer in the Department of English Philology (2017—), where she teaches Scientific English (Medicine) and English Phonetics and Phonology. Her main fields of research are English historical linguistics and sociolinguistics, diachronic dialectology and enregisterment in historical contexts. She has been a member of DING since 2017.

Collaborators

Carolina P. Amador-Moreno (University of Bergen, Norway)

Professor of English Linguistics

Carolina.Amador@uib.no

Carolina P. Amador-Moreno is Professor of English Linguistics at the University of Bergen. She has held different teaching positions at the University of Extremadura (Department of English), the University of Limerick (Department of Languages and Cultural Studies), and University College Dublin (English Department). Her research interests centre on the English spoken in Ireland and include historical linguistics, stylistics, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, sociolinguistics, and pragmatics. Her publications include articles and chapters dealing with these topics. She is the author, among others, of Orality in written texts: Using historical corpora to investigate Irish English (1700-1900) (2019); An Introduction to Irish English (2010); the co-edited volumes Irish Identities: Sociolinguistic Perspectives (2020); Voice and Discourse in the Irish Context (2017); and Pragmatic Markers in Irish English (2015). She has been involved in different research projects, at local, national and international level. She’s an associate member of CALS (Centre for Applied Language Studies), IVACS (Inter-Variational Applied Corpus Linguistics network), both at the University of Limerick, and LINGLAP (the Research Institute for Linguistics and Applied Languages), at the University of Extremadura, which she she was Director of until August 2020. She has been a member of the DING group since 2021.

Nuria Calvo Cortés (Complutense University of Madrid)

Lecturer in English Language and Linguistics

ncalvo@filol.ucm.es

Nuria Calvo Cortés has worked as a Lecturer at Complutense University in Madrid (UCM) since 2006. In 2012 she defended her PhD Thesis in English historical linguistics, more specifically on historical cognitive semantics and syntax in the Late Modern English period. She has always shown an interest in English historical and diachronic linguistics, making use of different corpora to carry out a variety of studies. In the last few years, she has concentrated on the analysis of some grammatical aspects of British novels of the 18th and 19th centuries, written mainly by women, from a cognitive perspective. One of her points of interest in this respect is the variety shown in the voices of the narrator and the characters present in the novels, as they often display features that point to dialectal or social differences. Her research is presently also focused on grammatical, sociolinguistic and pragmatic aspects of petitions written in the 18th and 19th centuries in Britain and signed by people belonging to some marginal groups of society, including women and prisoners. She has been a member of the DING group since 2021.

Juan Camilo Conde Silvestre (University of Murcia)

Professor of English Language and Linguistics

jcconde@um.es

Juan Camilo Conde Silvestre is Full Professor in English at the University of Murcia. He has mainly lectured on Medieval English Literature, Old English and the History of the English Language (Middle English, Early and Late Modern English), as well as a variety of courses for postgraduate students on Beowulf, the Old English Elegies, the History of English and Research Methods in (Socio)Historical Linguistics. He was Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Manchester (1992) and at the Centre for Medieval Studies at Toronto University (2019). He has also been visiting scholar and lecturer at several Spanish and British universities (Sevilla, León, Oviedo, Vigo, Málaga, Jaén, Castellón, Exeter, Essex and Chester). His main research interests are Historical Sociolinguistics, the History of the English Language (mainly Middle English dialectology) and Old English literature. Juan Camilo was Executive Director of SELIM (the Spanish Society for Medieval English Language and Literature) between 2002 and 2008, and Chair from 2008 to 2012 and from 2014 to 2018. He is member of the advisory board of international journals and has acted as external advisor for the panels “Historical linguistics” and “Medieval and Renaissance Studies” of AEDEAN conferences, for Servicio de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Vigo, for the Swiss National Science Foundation, for Cambridge University Press as well as differentjournals. In 2015 he was appointed General Editor of Atlantis. Journal of the Spanish Association of Angloamerican Studies (ISSN: 0210-6124 / e-ISSN 1989-6849). From 2018, he is co-editor (with Dr. Javier Calle) of the series Middle and Early Modern English Texts published by Peter Lang. He has been a member of the DING group since 2021.

Paul Cooper (University of Liverpool, United Kingdom)

Lecturer in English Language

P.Cooper@liverpool.ac.uk

Paul Cooper’s research focuses on how regional dialect features are enregistered in English. Enregisterment is a process whereby a repertoire or set of language features becomes overtly linked with social values (see also Agha 2003, Johnstone et al. 2006). These social values can include class membership, regional origin, or personality traits such as ‘friendliness’. Evidence for enregistered features can be seen in dialect writing (e.g. dialect poems, songs, or where dialect is represented in literature), as well as in metapragmatic discourse or ‘commentary’ on language in forums where language is discussed (newspapers, or online in social media posts on Twitter, for instance); or where dialect features are used on commodities such as dialect dictionaries or t-shirts. Further evidence of this kind can be gained from conducting interviews to elicit speakers’ knowledge of which language features are linked to what social values. His current research looks at the enregisterment of Yorkshire dialect, both in historical contexts (via the study of nineteenth-century dialect writing) and today (via interviews with Yorkshire speakers, online surveys, and the study of modern dialect writing). He is also interested in Liverpool English, a.k.a. Scouse, and the social values associated with this variety. Additionally, he is looking at how both of these varieties are evaluated and used as linguistic resources in educational contexts by younger speakers. He has been a member of the DING group since 2021.

Doctoral Students

René Pérez Tissens

renetissens@usal.es

René Pérez Tissens obtained a BA in English Studies from the University of Salamanca (2018) and an MA in Secondary Education and Foreign Language Teaching from the University of Salamanca (2019). He is currently working on his PhD dissertation on the enregisterment of the Devonshire dialect during the Late Modern English period under the supervision of Javier Ruano-García. He has presented papers at the universities of Extremadura, Málaga and Zaragoza, as well as published his research on dialect writing in Late Modern Scots and its impinge on modern writing. His main fields of investigation encompass historical linguistics and sociolinguistics, with a special interest in the philological environment of Scotland and the West Country. He has been a member of the DING group since 2021.

Almudena Santalla Rodríguez

asantalla@usal.es

Almudena Santalla Rodríguez holds a BA in English Studies from the University of Salamanca (1991) and an MA in Advanced English Studies from the Universities of Salamanca and Valladolid (2020). She is currently writing her PhD dissertation on Late-19th-century Devonshire Dialect: Mary Hartier (1861-1936) under the supervision of Ms. María F. García-Bermejo Giner. She also works as a secondary teacher at IES Lucía de Medrano, where she is the Coordinator of Excellence Baccalaureate in Foreign Languages. Her main fields of research are English historical linguistics and sociolinguistics, diachronic dialectology and Devonshire dialect. She has been a member of DING since 2021.

Manuel Villamarín González

manuelvillamarin@usal.es

Manuel Villamarín González holds a BA in English Studies from the University of Salamanca (2020). In 2021, he graduated from the MA in Advanced English Studies (Universities of Salamanca and Valladolid) with a dissertation on the British diaspora in Australia that was supervised by Pilar Sánchez-García and for which he received the extraordinary award. Manuel is currently working on his PhD under the supervision of Javier Ruano-García and Pilar Sánchez-García. His research interests include phonetics and phonology, English historical linguistics, diachronic dialectology, literary dialects and dialect literature, and the British diaspora.